Teach Your Kids to Be Thankful Every Day of the Year

Thank goodness for Thanksgiving!  It’s our once-a-year reminder that we have a lot to be thankful for.  If you are like me, it’s also my once-a-year reminder that I need to be more thankful the REST of the year.  As a mother, I’ve tried to instill a culture of thankfulness into my children.  Fortunately, it’s an easy thing to do.  Here are a few simple ideas:

Teach Your Kids To Be Thankful All Year Long

Teach your kids to be thankful every day of the year!

1.  Help your children to notice all that they have to be thankful for by pointing out the wonders and goodness around them.  For example, a trip to the park can include the comment, “Aren’t we lucky to have such a great park near our house? I’m so glad it is here!”

2.  Thank your children when they do something good or kind, better yet, do so on a regular basis.

3.  Teach your children about the freedoms they have and enjoy.  That way they will learn to value the freedoms they have and will learn to be a good citizen.

4.  Freely and openly thank others in front of your children.  Saying thank you to a caring friend in front of your child is a very valuable lesson.

5.  Turn unexpected or negative events into an exercise in gratitude.  For example, a rainy day that caused a trip to the beach to be canceled can be turned into an exercise in gratitude.  “You know, this rainy day is the perfect way for us to bake your favorite cookies.  If it weren’t for the rain – there’d be no cookies!”

6.  Every now and then, ask your children what they are most thankful for.  You’ll be amazed at what they say!

Growing Grateful Kids

Growing Grateful Kids is a great asset for any family to have!

For more helpful advice on how to raise thankful kids, check out the book, Growing Grateful Kids by Susie Larson.  Susie has a wonderful perspective on how to raise your children to be thankful and content without all of the latest and greatest material possessions.   Another great parenting resource is the book Being a Great Mom, Raising Great Kids by Sharon Jaynes.  Another good read is Raising Real Men, Surviving, Teaching and Appreciating Boys by Hal & Melanie Young.

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November is National Aviation History Month

Children the world over seem captivated by flight.  Whether it is hot air balloons, paper airplanes, rockets, jumbo jets, or space craft, the concept of flight has sparked the imagination.  In honor of National Aviation History Month, here are some interesting flight facts you may not have known!

1783 First Hot Air Balloon Flight in France.

797 First parachute jump.  André-Jacques Garnerin dropped from about 6,500 ft over Monceau Park in Paris in a 23-foot-diameter parachute made of white canvas with a basket attached

This is the first known aerial photo ever taken. It was taken over Boston, Massachusetts.

This is the first known aerial photo ever taken. It was taken over Boston, Massachusetts.

1860 First Aerial Photographs.  Samuel Archer King and William Black made took two photos of Boston.

1903 First successful airplane flight.  Orville and Wright successfully flew a homemade airplane 120 feet in 12 seconds.  Later in the day, Wilbur Wright stayed in up for 59 seconds and covered 852 feet.

1910 First licensed female pilot.  Baroness Raymonde de la Roche of France, who learned to fly in 1909, received ticket No. 36 on March 8, making her the first licensed female pilot.

1919 First transatlantic flight.  Lt. Comander Albert C. Read reached Lisbon, Portugal after hops from Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland, to Horta, Azores to Ponta Delgada.

1924 First Around-the-World Flight. Four Douglas Cruiser biplanes of the U.S. Army Air Corps took off from Seattle under command of Maj. Frederick Martin (April 6). 175 days later, two of the planes (Lt. Lowell Smith’s and Lt. Erik Nelson’s) landed in Seattle after a circuitous route—one source saying 26,345 mi, another saying 27,553 mi.

1932 First woman’s transatlantic solo. Amelia Earhart, flying a Pratt & Whitney Wasp-powered Lockheed Vega, flew alone from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, to Ireland in approximately 15 hours.

1937 First successful helicopter flight.  Hanna Reitsch, a German pilot, flew Dr. Heinrich Focke’s FW-61 in a free, fully controlled flight.

 1944 First production stage rocket-engine fighter plane. The German Messerschmitt Me 163B Komet (test flown 1941) became operational in June 1944. Some 350 of these delta-wing fighters were built before WWII in Europe ended.

1949 First round-the-world nonstop flight.  Capt. James Gallagher and USAF crew of 13 flew a Boeing B-50A Superfortress around the world nonstop from Ft. Worth, returning to same point covering 23,452 miles in 94 hours and 1 minute.  There were four aerial refuelings en route.

1958 First domestic airline jet passenger service. National Airlines began service between New York and Miami.

1978 First successful transatlantic ballon flight. Ben Abruzzo, Larry Newman, and Maxie Anderson, completed the crossing in their helium-filled balloon, known as the Double Eagle II.

1986 First nonstop flight around the world without refueling. From Edwards AFB, Calif., Dick Rutan and Jeana Yeager flew their Voyager around the world (24,986.727 miles), returning to Edwards AFB in 216 hours, 3 minutes, 44 seconds.

2002 First solo nonstop round-the-world balloon flight. Steve Fossett flew from Northam, West Australia, to Lake Yamma Yamma, Queensland, Australia, landing after 14 days, 19 hrs. He broke three balloon records along the way: fastest time around the world, longest distance flown solo, and longest time flown solo.

To learn more fascinating facts on flight, check out the book: Eyewitness:  Flight.

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Build Your Own Survival Kit With This Basic Survival Kit Checklist

Building your own basic survival kit is easy and fun to do.  It is the perfect addition to your pack when you’re camping, fishing, hiking or hunting.  By making your kit ahead of time, you can take it with you whenever your adventure leads you into the wilderness.

The Bear Grylls Basic Survival Kit

The Bear Grylls Basic Survival Kit has all the essentials that a good survival kit should have.

There are a couple of things to keep in mind.  A survival kit such as this one is only useful if you know how to use the items in it.  So be sure to practice proper use of the items with your family before you head out.  Also, JM Cremp’s carries some excellent survival books that give instruction and tips for survival situations.  Two of our favorites are The Ultimate Survival Manual and Essential Survival Skills.

Put Your Pack Together Today! (Click here to download your Basic Survival Kit Checklist)

Remember:  This is a basic starter list, so you can add or take away whatever you need to customize your pack for your situation.  JM Cremps carries the Gerber Bear Grylls Survivial Kit.  This survival kit is small and compact and  will fit in a large jacket pocket.  You can use it as is or build upon it to include more options for your situation.

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How to Build A Plastic Parachute Guy

Here’s the perfect project to cure boredom.  Help your kids build their very own plastic parachuter and they’ll have something fun to play with today AND tomorrow.  It’s fun and easy to do, and best of all – it’s the perfect project for families to do together.

What you need:

  • A plastic grocery store bag
  • Scissors
  • String or twine
  • A marker
  • Tape
  • A hole punch
  • A small figure or weight to act as your parachutist
Gather Your Necessary Supplies.

Gather Your Necessary Supplies.

Cut out your parachute.

Lay your plastic bag flat. Draw a large circle on the center of the bag. It is easiest if you trace a plate or large plastic bowl.

Mark 4 evenly spaced spots on your circle.

Mark four evenly spaced spots on the edge of your circle. This is where you will attach the parachute strings.

Place a small piece of tape over your marked areas.

Place a small piece of tape over your marked areas. This will provide reinforcement so that the plastic doesn’t tear.

Using a hole punch, punch a hole in the four spots that you taped and marked.

Using a hole punch, punch a hole in the four spots that you taped and marked.

Cut four equal-length strings the length of which should be slightly longer than the diameter of the plastic circle.

Cut four equal-length strings the length of which should be slightly longer than the diameter of the plastic circle.

Carefully tie one string to each of the holes you made in the plastic.  Be careful not to rip the plastic.

Carefully tie one string to each of the holes you made in the plastic. Be careful not to rip the plastic.

Tie the strings around your object.  A plastic army man, a figurine, or other small toy that weighs 5 to 10 grams is best.

Tie the strings around your object. A plastic army man, a figurine, or other small toy that weighs 5 to 10 grams is best.

You're all set!  Just drop your parachuter off a high spot and you'll see the chute open up and begin to catch air.

You’re all set! Just drop your parachuter off a high spot and you’ll see the chute open up and begin to catch air.

If you like projects like this, check out the Duct Tape Project CD series titled Warfare By Duct Tape.  The projects in these e-books will keep kids busy for hours.  They’ll learn how to make a shield, a sword, and even a helmet.  If outdoor projects are more your style, then the Handy Dad Series books are perfect.   If science is your thing, then check out The Geek Dad Book for Aspiring Mad Scientists.  It’s a fun father/son science project book.

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikiHow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Make a Plastic Parchute. Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

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How to Make the Perfect Stunt Plane Paper Airplane

It’s easy to make the perfect paper airplane that flies loop de loops.  All you need is a piece of paper and you’re all set!

How to Make a Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 1. Start with a plain piece of paper. You can use any size you’d like. In this example, we took a regular notebook-sized piece and cut the bottom 1/3 off.

How to Make a Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 2. Open the folded paper. Fold the top two corners towards the middle until they meet with the crease.

How to Make the Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 3. Fold the point straight down to the bottom edge of the paper.

How to Make a Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 4. Flip the paper over and repeat step 2.

How to Make a Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 5. Turn the paper over again. You will see a perfect triangle formed at the top. Fold the bottom half of the diamond up to form a triangle at the top.

How to Make a Paper Airplane

Step 6. Fold the airplane in half keeping your newly formed triangle on the outside of the fold.

How to Make A Perfect Paper Airplane

Step 7. Fold each wing down to form the plane.

If you need help or get stuck making this plane, you can view the animated instructions here.  For even more paper airplane ideas and instructions, check out the Dangerous Book For Boys.  It’s loaded with fun projects and ideas to keep your boys busy.

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikiHow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Make a Paper Airplane.  Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

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Encourage Your Boys With a Little Help from Raising Boys By Design

As a parent of boys, you know that they are unique, different, and special.  Raising Boys by Design, by Gregory L Jantz, PhD, and Michael Gurian, is a helpful resource that we as parents can turn to that will help us guide our boys through the unique challenges they face.   You know that your son was created for great things, but he needs your help to appreciate his unique male design and to grow into the strong loving man God created him to be.

Raising Boys by Design

Boys are unique and we can encourage them in their uniqueness with a little help from one of our favorite books.

Packed with doable strategies and eye-opening examples of what’s really going on inside a boy’s brain, Raising Boys by Design offers a practical blueprint to help you build a HERO–one who values Honor, Enterprise, Responsibility, and Originality. Among other things, you’ll learn how to help your son:

• strengthen his character, resilience, and self-discipline
• nurture genuine compassion and empathy
• process words and emotions in ways that fit his brain chemistry
• succeed in school and hone crucial life skills
• develop a healthy perspective of sexuality
• avoid the pitfalls of media and technology
• embark on a lifelong adventure of faith

Raising Boys by Design is one of our go-to resource books for raising boys, but don’t take our word for it.  Here are some reviews we’ve found to be insightful:

Raising Boys by Design is a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable read. It’s marvelously inspiring, well thought out, and academically supported, but it’s also an intuitive guide to raising boys. Every parent, teacher, and grandparent could benefit from this work.”
—Gary Thomas, author of Sacred Marriage and Sacred Parenting

“Blending biblical truth with brain science, Raising Boys by Design is truly a ground-breaking resource that offers much-needed insights for guiding boys toward health and success in every area of life.”
—Tim Clinton, PhD, president of the American Association of Christian Counselors and executive director of the Center for Counseling and Family Studies at Liberty University

“Raising boys in today’s world is no easy task. We need to understand how boys process their emotions and deal with bullying, peer pressure, technology and other important issues—all of which are covered here. This must-read resource helps equip families to raise sons who will be well adjusted and heroes for life.”
—Linda Mintle, PhD, author of Raising Healthy Kids in an Unhealthy World

“We live in a society where it’s dangerous to be a normal, rambunctious, healthy boy. High energy is labeled hyperactive, competitiveness to excel is deemed selfish, and single-mindedness in completion of a task is considered insensitive. Society’s constant attack on normal maleness instills a destructive insecurity and sense of inferiority into countless thousands of otherwise normal healthy men. Raising Boys by Designbrilliantly exposes this destructive trend while providing meaningful insights and applicable solutions. If you want to protect your sons from the corrosive effects of today’s world and empower them to become men after God’s own heart, then this book is for you.”
—Timothy R. Jennings, MD, author of The God-Shaped Brain, president-elect of the Tennessee Psychiatric Association, and chairman, board of regents, of the Southern Psychiatric Association

Raising Boys by Design is a clearly written and helpful book that integrates biblical truth and findings from brain science to enable sons to thrive as they grow up into adulthood.”
—Siang-Yang Tan, PhD, professor of psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary and author of Counseling and Psychotherapy: A Christian Perspective

Besides, Raising Boys by Design, JM Cremp’s has several excellent books on raising boys.

Boys Should Be Boys by Meg Meeder, M.D.

The Ministry of Motherhood by Sally Clarkson

Raising Real Men:  Surviving, Teaching and Appreciating Boys by Hal and Melanie Young 

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Make Applesauce with Your Kids in 4 Easy Steps

What do you do on a rainy Saturday afternoon in the fall when the kids are bored and stuck in the house?  That’s the question I’m faced with today, and my roadside fruit stand provided the inspiration in the form of an abundance of apples.  I’ve decided to forgo the pie and opt for a healthier option that allows the kids to be more involved.  So today is applesauce making day!

Homemade applesauce is easy so easy to make, you’ll find yourself wondering why you haven’t done it earlier!

First, gather your ingredients:

  • 8 medium apples
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 c. brown sugar
  • 1/2 c. water
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon (optional)

Step 1. Wash and peel the apples.

Step 1 how to make applesauce with kids

Step 2.  Core and slice the apple.  Chop the apple into 1/2 inch to 1 inch chunks.

Step 2 How to Make Applesauce

Step 3. Transfer the apples to a crockpot and pour 2 tsp of lemon juice over the sliced apples. Stir the apples to coat them with the juice.

Step 3 How to Make Applesauce

Step 4. Sprinkle the apples with the sugars, cinnamon, and vanilla. Add water. Cover and cook on low for approximately 6 hours. If the applesauce is too runny, remove the lid and cook on high for an additional 30 minutes.

Step 4 How to Make Applesauce

It’s really that easy!  Check out more ideas for easy projects with kids on our website at jmcremps.com.

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikiHow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Make Applesauce.  Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

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